INFANTS (0-12 MONTHS) DEVELOPMENTAL MILESTONES

Developmental milestones are things most children can do by a certain age. Children reach milestones in how they play, learn, speak, behave, and move (like crawling, walking, or jumping).

What happens to kids in childhood shapes who they become as adults. Children who are nurtured and supported throughout childhood are more likely to thrive and develop into happy, healthy and productive adults.

Positive Parenting Ages and Stages Infants (0-12 months) American SPCC

Baby's First Year Milestones

Skills such as taking a first step, smiling for the first time, and waving “bye-bye” are called developmental milestones.

In the first year, babies learn to focus their vision, reach out, explore, and learn about the things that are around them. Cognitive development means the learning process of memory, language, thinking, and reasoning. Learning language is more than making sounds (“babble”), or saying “ma-ma” and “da-da”. Listening, understanding, and knowing the names of people and things are all a part of language development.

During this stage, babies also are developing bonds of love and trust with their parents and others as part of social and emotional development. The way parents cuddle, hold, and play with their baby will serve as the foundation for how the children will interact with others.

Positive Parenting Tips for Infants

The following are some things you, as a parent, can do to help your baby during this time:

  • Talk to your baby. He/she will find your voice calming.
  • Answer when your baby makes sounds by repeating the sounds and adding words. This will help him learn to use language.
  • Read to your baby. This will help her develop and understand language and sounds.
  • Sing to your baby and play music. This will help your baby develop a love for music and will help his brain development.
  • Praise your baby and give her lots of loving attention.
  • Spend time cuddling and holding your baby. This will help him feel cared for and secure.
  • Play with your baby when she’s alert and relaxed. Watch your baby closely for signs of being tired or fussy so that she can take a break from playing.
  • Distract your baby with toys and move him to safe areas when he starts moving and touching things that he shouldn’t touch.
  • Take care of yourself physically, mentally, and emotionally. Parenting can be hard work! It is easier to enjoy your new baby and be a positive, loving parent when you are feeling good yourself

NEVER SHAKE A BABY! EVER!

In the United States, thousands of babies die unnecessarily each year or suffer severe irreversible brain injury due to Shaken Baby Syndrome (SBS).

The crying…the late-night feedings…the constant changing of diapers…the resulting exhaustion… The fact is that many new parents and caregivers find themselves unprepared for the realities of caring for a baby and the stress and aggravation that can accompany those realities.

Crying and colic are normal. Shaking is dangerous!
Frustrated with a crying baby? Put the baby in a safe place. Walk away. Take a break. Ask for help.

Help-and-Support-America-SPCC-The-Nation's-Voice-for-Children

Additional Resources

CHILD CAR SEAT SAFETY & EQUIPMENT

RECOMMENDATIONS BY NHTSA

Place your baby in a rear-facing car seat in the back seat while he is riding in a car. Find the right child car seat at the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Here’s a pdf version for download by the NHTSA.

CHILD SAFETY & HEALTH

IMPORTANT TIPS TO KEEP IN MIND

When a baby becomes part of your family, it is time to make sure that your home is a safe place. Look around your home for things that could be dangerous to your baby. As a parent, it is your job to ensure that you create a safe home for your baby. It also is important that you take the necessary steps to make sure that you are mentally and emotionally ready for your new baby. Here are a few tips to keep your baby safe:

  • Do not shake your baby―ever! Babies have very weak neck muscles that are not yet able to support their heads. If you shake your baby, you can damage his brain or even cause his death.
  • Make sure you always put your baby to sleep on her back to prevent sudden infant death syndrome (commonly known as SIDS). Read more about new recommendations for safe sleep for infants here.
  • Protect your baby and family from secondhand smoke. Do not allow anyone to smoke in your home.
  • Place your baby in a rear-facing car seat in the back seat while he is riding in a car. This is recommended by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
  • Prevent your baby from choking by cutting her food into small bites. Also, don’t let her play with small toys and other things that might be easy for her to swallow.
  • Don’t allow your baby to play with anything that might cover her face.
  • Never carry hot liquids or foods near your baby or while holding him.
  • Vaccines (shots) are important to protect your child’s health and safety. Because children can contract serious diseases, it is important that children receive the right shots at the right time. Talk with your pediatrician to make sure that your child is up-to-date on vaccinations.

HEALTH

  • Keep your baby active. She might not be able to run and play like the “big kids” just yet, but there’s lots she can do to keep her little arms and legs moving throughout the day. Getting down on the floor to move helps your baby become strong, learn, and explore.
  • Try not to keep your baby in swings, strollers, bouncer seats, and exercise saucers for too long.
  • Limit screen time to a minimum. For children younger than 2 years of age, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that it’s best if babies do not watch any screen media.
CRYING, COLIC & The Period of Purple Crying

CRYING AND COLIC ARE NORMAL

The fact is that crying—including prolonged bouts of inconsolable crying— is normal developmental behavior in babies. It helps to think of crying as one of the ways babies communicate.
Parenting-Period-of-Purple-Crying-SBSFirst, understand that crying is a normal developmental stage. The Period of PURPLE Crying begins at about 2 weeks of age and continues until about 3-4 months of age. There are other common characteristics of this phase, or period, which are better described by the acronym PURPLE. All babies go through this period. It is during this time that some babies can cry a lot and some far less, but they all go through it. You can learn more about Shaken Baby Syndrome and The Period of Purple Crying at purplecrying.info, and at the National Center for Shaken Baby Syndrome.
READ MORE

FEEDING VIDEOS & BREASTFEEDING

FEEDING & BREASTFEEDING

  • Breast milk meets all your baby’s needs for about the first 6 months of life. Between 6 and 12 months of age, your baby will learn about new tastes and textures with healthy solid food, but breast milk should still be an important source of nutrition.
  • Feed your baby slowly and patiently, encourage your baby to try new tastes but without force, and watch closely to see if he’s still hungry.
  • Breastfeeding is the natural way to feed your baby, but it can be challenging. If you need help, you can call the National Breastfeeding Helpline at 800-994-9662 or get help on-line at http://www.womenshealth.gov/breastfeeding. You can also call your local WIC Program to find out if you qualify for breastfeeding support by health professionals or peer counselors. Or visit http://gotwww.net/ilca to find an International Board-Certified Lactation Consul­tant in your community.

Join the conversation! Engage and connect on our Positive Parenting forum.

Whether you need advice or have advice to give, our forum is the place to connect with a growing community committed to the care of the next generation.

POSITIVE PARENTING IMPACT STORIES

MY DAUGHTER HAS SCHIZOAFFECTIVE DISORDER

October 30, 2017

Schizoaffective disorder is a complex combination of schizophrenia and mood disorders, and difficult to diagnose because of overlapping symptoms. Each Continue Reading

MOM'S HERO – BIRTH STORY

September 29, 2017

On 4/19/17 I went into labor at 38 weeks, and gave birth to my son Mason. On 4/18/17 at 11:00 Continue Reading

American SPCC Share Your Story - Volunteer for Anti-Bullying

VOLUNTEER FOR ANTI-BULLYING

September 25, 2017

I’m a mom of three, doctoral student, and director for an educational software sales company. I got involved with the Continue Reading

ABUSED & BULLIED

April 12, 2017

My dad died when I was 2 years old, and my mom got married the second time when I was Continue Reading

Help others by sharing your story of inspiration and hope.

Click for References & Sources

  1. Information Courtesy of CDC.
  2. Parenting Tip Sheet Infants (0-1 year of age) CDC.

Leave your comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.