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Exercise With Your Child Week

  • Start: May 4, 2018 12:00 am
  • End: August 11, 2018 12:00 am

Exercise With Your Child Week,
August 4th - 11th

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), children and adolescents should do 60 minutes (1 hour) or more of physical activity each day.

This may sound like a lot, but don’t worry! Your child may already be meeting the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. And, you’ll soon discover all the easy and enjoyable ways to help your child meet the recommendations. Encourage your child to participate in activities that are age-appropriate, enjoyable and offer variety! Just make sure your child or adolescent is doing three types of physical activity:

1. Aerobic Activity

Aerobic activity should make up most of your child’s 60 or more minutes of physical activity each day. This can include either moderate-intensity aerobic activity, such as brisk walking, or vigorous-intensity activity, such as running. Be sure to include vigorous-intensity aerobic activity on at least 3 days per week.

2. Muscle Strengthening

Include muscle strengthening activities, such as gymnastics or push-ups, at least 3 days per week as part of your child’s 60 or more minutes.

3. Bone Strengthening

Include bone strengthening activities, such as jumping rope or running, at least 3 days per week as part of your child’s 60 or more minutes.

Tips on Getting Children Active

  • Set a positive example by leading an active lifestyle yourself.
  • Make physical activity part of your family’s daily routine by taking family walks or playing active games together.
  • Give your children equipment that encourages physical activity.
  • Take young people to places where they can be active, such as public parks, community baseball fields or basketball courts.
  • Be positive about the physical activities in which your child participates and encourage them to be interested in new activities.
  • Make physical activity fun. Fun activities can be anything your child enjoys, either structured or non-structured. Activities can range from team sports or individual sports to recreational activities such as walking, running, skating, bicycling, swimming, playground activities or free-time play.
  • Instead of watching television after dinner, encourage your child to find fun activities to do on their own or with friends and family, such as walking, playing chase or riding bikes.
  • Be safe! Always provide protective equipment such as helmets, wrist pads or knee pads and ensure that activity is age-appropriate.

Join the Positive Parenting discussion!

Discuss all the fun ways that you are helping keep kids active this summer on our Community & Support Forum!

References and Sources

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Making Physical Activity a Part of a Child’s Life: https://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/basics/adding-pa/activities-children.html
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